sophia_sol: drawing of Combeferre, smiling and holding up a finger like he's about to explain something (Default)
2010-09-19 07:27 am

[sticky entry] Sticky: Introduction Post!

Hi there! I'm Sophia, and this is my journal. If you want to know more about me and about what you can find on my journal, this is the place! )
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2017-07-21 08:52 pm

The Scorpion Rules, by Erin Bow (audiobook)

I have been hopelessly obsessed with these books since I read them, and if there was any fandom for them to speak of I WOULD BE IN THAT FANDOM but since there are no epic-length fics for me to be reading, I'm left with just...rereading the books themselves. Even though I don't usually do rereads that soon after a first read. But this time I'm doing it by audiobook so it's at least a different experience!

It's been a while since I've listened to an audiobook, so I'd forgotten how much more intense and immersive an experience audiobooks are? There's no skimming or skipping ahead possible, and you can't read faster as it gets more exciting. You're stuck at speaking pace for every single sentence in the book so there's plenty of time for things to really sink in.

I mean, I knew this already, this is why I generally don't read novels by audiobook as my first exposure to the book, it's too stressful for my delicate sensibilities. I definitely would not have been able to handle The Scorpion Rules by audiobook if I didn't already know everything that would happen. But I was still surprised by how different an experience it was to listen to it as audiobook.

For one thing the horrifying nature of everything that happens was way more directly horrifying, oh my god. Like I did notice this stuff but it didn't strike me as much on first read through when I was all focused on questions of what happens next.

Read more... )
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2017-07-18 07:22 pm

An Old Fashioned Girl, by Louisa May Alcott

Ah yes, very much in the usual style of Alcott's moralizing tales for young folks: ridiculous and kind of preachy, but also somehow charming.

It's a book about how poverty, modesty in dress, old-fashioned manners, hard work, and familial love are what you need to live a happy and fulfilling life, as shown by contrasting the main character Polly with her rich city friend Fanny and Fanny's family. The first part of the book takes place when Polly's about 14, and the remainder is Six Years Later when they're all adults.

I don't love this book as much as some of Alcott's others, but it's possible that's just because I was introduced to this one so much later. I grew up reading the Little Women trilogy, and Eight Cousins/Rose In Bloom, so there's a great deal of nostalgia factor in my love for those books, I think.

But it also seems to me the case that Polly, far more than the lead characters in these other books, is deliberately put forward as a model girl, which makes it harder to see and like her as just a person. And I don't understand Polly's interest in her designated love interest at all, which doesn't help me to feel happy with the conclusion of the book. (But then there are plenty of narrative choices in Alcott's other books that I also don't like, including some that I don't like a lot more than this (I AM STILL SO MAD ABOUT WHAT HAPPENS TO DAN IN JO'S BOYS), so who knows whence comes my lesser love for this book.)

My favourite part was the part where we meet all of Polly's female friends who also work for a living. Their close friendship and love and support for each other is great. Unfortunately this was just one short scene in the whole novel - definitely not an actual focus.
sophia_sol: drawing of Combeferre, smiling and holding up a finger like he's about to explain something (Default)
2017-07-15 12:31 pm

The Swan Riders, by Erin Bow

OH GOSH!!! It's hard to know what to say about this book. It was SO GOOD.

in which I find a lot of things to say anyway )
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2017-07-13 07:54 pm

The Scorpion Rules, by Erin Bow

Well, this was not what I expected, and also AMAZING. It's a YA future dystopia sort of novel, which seems like it's probably going to fall into the standard pattern of Special Girl meets Special Boy and learns she must REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM. And then it....doesn't do that. It does other things.

Read more... )
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2017-07-12 06:59 pm

The Rock That Is Higher: Story As Truth, by Madeleine L'Engle

This is not the kind of book I ordinarily would have chosen to read, but my mom gave it to me years ago and so I kind of felt obligated to get around to it eventually.

It's a very odd sort of book and I'm not quite sure how to categorize it. Somewhere between memoir, writing advice, ode to the power of stories, and Christian witness, I guess? The genre that it seems most similar to me personally is the sermon, actually: using both personal experiences and biblical stories to illustrate a point about Christianity.

L'Engle wrote this book in her old age, after a very serious car accident where she was significantly injured. So she talks a lot about that, of course, but also uses illustrations from throughout her life.

I found it largely a pleasant sort of book to read; not particularly mindblowing or anything, and there were some parts that were tedious, but mostly it feels like just hanging out with the best kind of elderly church lady. Her overall theme - of story (and particularly the Christian story) as truth rather than fact - is good, as is her general loving approach to religion and life.
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2017-07-11 08:21 pm

The Sorcerer's Ship, by Hannes Bok

Meh. Written in the 1940's by a man, and the gender dynamics are unfortunately what you'd expect from that origin. Also the plot and characters are not what one might call nuanced. According to the internet, the people who like this book like it for its prose and imagery, not its plot and characters, but I wasn't struck by the prose and imagery myself - I mean, it's fine, but nothing special, and not worth reading the kinda-crap story for, since there's plenty of better books with just as good (and better!) prose/imagery.
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2017-07-08 08:03 pm

A Queen From The North, by Erin McRae and Racheline Maltese

Another book that I wanted to like more than I actually did. It's a perfectly fine book, but I don't love it.

Read more... )
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2017-07-06 07:04 pm

Dawn, by Octavia Butler (Xenogenesis #1)

Octavia Butler is a highly-renowned author in sf and I've been intending to read her for ages, so when a friend lent me an omnibus of the Xenogenesis trilogy I was excited! But although Dawn (first in that trilogy) is objectively a good book, it really wasn't for me.

Read more... )
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2017-07-03 12:45 pm

Breadcrumbs, by Anne Ursu

I picked this up because it was recced by [personal profile] skygiants as her favourite Snow Queen retelling, which obviously was going to be of interest to me as a thorough and longstanding Snow Queen fan.

Read more... )

And if anyone has recommendations of other novels based on The Snow Queen please do let me know so I can read them too! So far this one and the one by T. Kingfisher are the only ones I've come across.
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2017-06-29 09:39 pm

Summer 2017 short story recs

It's time for my approximately-annual short story recommendation list, wherein I tell you about ten stories I read in the last year that I think are particularly worth reading, and link you to them. I've been reading more short stories of late so keeping the list to only ten was particularly hard this time!

Without further ado, here's some stories to read:

1. Who Will Greet You At Home, by Lesley Nneka Arimah
A story about how babies are made out of physical materials and the blessings of your mother, and the lengths to which people will go to have a baby. Strange and sad and disturbing.

2. Probably Still the Chosen One, by Kelly Barnhill
At 11 years old, Corrina was the Chosen One in a land through a secret portal only she could access. Then she's left behind in this world, expecting at any moment to be called back. It's a great look at, among other things, how the political situation you're thrown into looks very different when you're eleven than when you're an adult. I love this sort of deconstruction of tropes.

3. Seasons of Glass and Iron, by Amal El-Mohtar
In which the heroines of two fairy tales (the princess on the glass mountain, and the girl who has to walk through seven pairs of iron shoes) help each other see how terribly they've been treated. What an excellent way of doing a fairy-tale mash-up!

4. Suradanna and the Sea, by Rebecca Fraimow
I love this story so much! The worldbuilding is incredible, and the characterization, and the relationship between the main characters, and basically everything. I'll borrow a description from the author of what this story's about: "Trade routes, magical fertilizer, and one girl's centuries-long effort to impress a woman who is already in a committed relationship with a boat."

5. The Nalendar, by Ann Leckie
Leckie has written a number of short stories that all take place in the same world, broadly speaking. You can tell which stories these are by the gods. I love all these stories (so interesting!), but decided to rec The Nalendar in particular. This story is about a woman who makes an agreement with an untrustworthy small god who's after something.

6. Extracurricular Activities, by Yoon Ha Lee
This one is a fun space adventure story! (Yes I am in fact capable of enjoying and recommending straightforward adventure stories, even if you wouldn't guess it based on the other kinds of things I tend to rec....)

7. The Wreck at Goat's Head, by Alexandra Manglis
About a free-diver in the Mediterranean, one of the last remaining in the 21st century. A lovely story of grief and loss and living, and I like how well-grounded it is in its setting.

8. And Then There Were (N-One), by Sarah Pinsker
In which Sarah Pinsker is invited to a convention of multiverses of Sarah Pinskers, and then one of the Sarahs is murdered at the convention. A delightful premise, and a really interesting story.

9. The Dark Birds, by Ursula Vernon
The degree to which this story is horrifying creeps up on you the further you get - it's really effectively done. It's the story of a family where the ogre father eats his daughters, as told from the pov of the current baby of the family.

10. Utopia, LOL?, by Jamie Wahls
A man awakes from cryofreeze in the far future, and we see his introduction to this new world via the pov of his Tour Guide to the Future, who is easily-distractable and alarmingly enthusiastic. This story is weird and incredible and I was very surprised to be having feelings by the end given how much I was giggling through most of the story. I love it.
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2017-06-28 05:33 pm

This Wicked Gift, Proof By Seduction, and Trial By Desire, by Courtney Milan

Okay so I spent a few days in June reading a bunch of Courtney Milan. Apparently she's a "betcha can't eat read just one" kind of author for me. I read ten. Most were rereads, which I don't have anything new to say about, but this time I did get around to reading a few books of hers that I hadn't read in November when I last did this. Namely: the Carhart series, the first romances that Courtney Milan ever published! This was back when she was being conventionally published by Harlequin instead of being a self-published author.

This Wicked Gift, by Courtney Milan (Carhart #0.5)

cut for discussion of rape )


Proof By Seduction, by Courtney Milan (Carhart #1)

And so I continue with the Carhart series despite the extremely inauspicious beginnings. This one, well, at least it didn't have a rapist main character? I still didn't love it though. I dunno, I didn't write down my thoughts soon enough after having read it so I don't remember all the reasons. But it doesn't have the things I like about later Courtney Milan (such as strong female friendships and interesting families) and also doesn't have a romance that I enjoyed reading about. And the leading man was pretty uninteresting to me, and the leading woman kept making baffling life choices.


Trial By Desire, by Courtney Milan (Carhart #2)

The Carhart series continues to improve! This one was actually mostly enjoyable. I liked the leading woman's mission in life, and I enjoyed the nature of the romance being one of having to develop a relationship between a husband and wife who don't really know each other and have been on different continents for years. But although this is closer to the Courtney Milan I know and love, this book just didn't get me excited the way her later books do.
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2017-06-20 09:08 pm

The Steerswoman, by Rosemary Kirstein

I first heard a recommendation for this book a LONG time ago, so when I finally got my hands on a copy and started reading it, I had totally forgotten everything I'd been told of what to expect from this book.

So I found that what the book was actually about was rather unexpected for me. But in a good way!

Read more... )
sophia_sol: drawing of Combeferre, smiling and holding up a finger like he's about to explain something (Default)
2017-06-17 10:59 pm

Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812

This evening I listened to the new Broadway Cast Recording of the musical “Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812”, which you may recall I was obsessed with a while ago. I’ve listened to the original recording a million times, but I’d forgotten how many songs I’d excised from the playlist of it I listen to? Basically: I remove ALL OF PIERRE. Which is actually a fairly significant amount of the musical.

And listening to this other recording of the soundtrack, I didn’t skip any of the songs because then I wouldn’t get a complete sense, and I’m ONCE AGAIN AFIRE WITH RAGE ABOUT PIERRE. Why is Pierre such a major character? Why is there so much focus on Pierre? Why is Pierre the most boring person in the entire musical? PIERRE DOES NOTHING and yet he gets entire songs all about him, and he gets the emotional focus and resolution at the end of the musical instead of Natasha (who the story’s ACTUALLY about) and it’s the WORST.

AND this new version adds A WHOLE EXTRA 6.5 MINUTE PIERRE ANGST SONG WHAT THE FUCK. Adding an extra Pierre song does not actually make Pierre feel more integrated into the musical. And it is the most boring song. Why does it exist. Why does Pierre exist.

UGH. I love this musical so much in so many ways EXCEPT PIERRE’S EVERYTHING.

At any rate I guess it’s back to my carefully-excised original cast recording for me!
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2017-06-04 09:33 pm

Wonder Woman

I hadn't really been planning on going to see Wonder Woman because I've been feeling kind of burned out on superhero movies, but then the reactions started to get posted over the last few days, and seeing so many people be enthusiastic about this movie made me go WELL FINE and go and see it.

AND LO IT WAS GREAT.

Read more... )
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2017-06-04 08:54 pm

Guys & Dolls

Friday night I saw a production of Guys & Dolls. This is apparently a well-regarded and award-winning musical, and Stratford did a good job with it, but.....it is not the sort of musical calculated to win my affections. Its only appeal as far as I can see is just the spectacle. I mean there is a story but it's predictable (and sexist).

Read more... )
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2017-06-02 12:20 pm

The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K LeGuin

This is one of those books that I've been intending to read for a lot of years, have actually owned a copy of for multiple years, and just could never quite get around to reading it because I kind of got the impression it was the Serious Literature of the SFF world. And okay yes it kind of is that but it turns out it's also very readable!

This book is most well-known and widely-discussed for what it does with sex/gender. Namely: a planet of people who five-sixths of the time are sexless/genderless and also do not experience sexual desire, and the remainder of the time become either male or female for the purposes of reproduction and sexual activity.

It's disconcerting to me then that actually this stuff is what I care least about in this book? I have arguments with its treatment of gender (and sexuality). But I really enjoyed everything else about the book!

Read more... )
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2017-05-30 07:07 pm

Thick as Thieves, by Megan Whalen Turner

THE NEXT BOOK IN THE QUEEN'S THIEF SERIES!!!!

Megan Whalen Turner does not write fast. This is the first new book that's come out since before I got into the series. I was very worried about it not living up to expectations, since I have pretty high expectations for this series. But Thick as Thieves is a thoroughly worthy book to be added to the series and and I am relieved and delighted!

Read more... )
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2017-05-24 07:04 pm

Rivers of London #3-6

WELL I am now finished the Rivers of London series so I suppose I will post about the last four books all at once here since it feels weird to keep posting one at a time as if I'm not already done. Here we go!

Whispers Under Ground, by Ben Aaronovitch )

Broken Homes, by Ben Aaronovitch )

Foxglove Summer, by Ben Aaronovitch )

The Hanging Tree, by Ben Aaronovitch )
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2017-05-18 09:59 pm

Are You My Mother? by Alison Bechdel

Alison Bechdel's second comic memoir. Her first was Fun Home and was about her father and her relationship with him. This one does the same with her mother.

I wasn't nearly so into this book as I was Fun Home. I think my biggest problem with it is that it just so very much about psychoanalysis, which is not a topic that interests me, and in fact I'm rather skeptical about given how based in Freudian theory it is, and how much of Freud's theories have been discredited.

The book really felt more like it was about the psychoanalysis of Alison's relationship with her mother instead of actually about her actual relationship with her mother. So for what it is, it's well done, but it's just not what I personally wanted to be reading.

Oh well. I was warned going in by the friend who lent me this book that it's not as good as Fun Home, so at least my expectations were appropriate going in so I didn't experience unexpected disappointment.
sophia_sol: drawing of Combeferre, smiling and holding up a finger like he's about to explain something (Default)
2017-05-16 12:12 pm

Moon Over Soho, by Ben Aaronovitch

Second in the Rivers of London series. Another enjoyable book!

Read more... )